Judges

 

Please click images for full judge bios.

 
 
W. Keith Belvin
Dr. Keith Belvin
NASA Langley Research Center


Dr. Belvin, an internationally recognized expert in structural design and analysis, is a highly creative engineer, specializing in the areas of large space structures, structural dynamics, flexible structure control, and space vehicles structures and mechanisms design. He pioneered methods for integrating controls and structures disciplines for the design of efficient, high performance space platforms.

His creativity in testing and analysis of many different space structure configurations is highly regarded in NASA and industry. For example, Dr. Belvin’s breakthrough work in antenna surface shape control is still utilized by industry for space-based mesh communication antennas prior to launch. Dr. Belvin also led the development of a novel method for ground test validation of solar sails where none previously existed.

He is an advocate of modular space systems design and supports development of in-space assembly (iSA), in-space manufacturing (iSM) and in-space servicing (iSS) capabilities. With over 35 years experience in space systems development, he currently serves as the Principal Technologist in NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) for structures, materials, and nanotechnology and provides strategic direction for research and development.

Keith Belvin
NASA Headquarters

Anthony Calomino
Dr. Anthony Calomino
NASA Langley Research Center


Dr. Anthony Calomino is a materials and structures research engineer with the NASA Langley Research Center and has worked for NASA since 1985. He has a bachelor’s and master’s degree in Structural and Engineering Mechanics, and obtained a doctorate in Materials Science from Northwestern University. His primary research is in durability and damage modeling for high temperature materials and composites including metallic super alloys, ceramic matrix composites, ablators, and refractory soft goods. Dr. Calomino currently serves as the NASA Materials technical lead for Entry Systems Modeling project and the Deputy Principal Investigator for Flexible Systems Development under NASA’s Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) project.

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Anthony Calomino
NASA Langley Research Center

 
Fred Elliott
Fred Elliott
NASA Glenn Research Center


Fred Elliott is currently a project manager with the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio and has been employed by NASA since 1985. He has a bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Akron (UA) and began his NASA career as a cooperative education student supporting tests in the Vertical Motion Simulator at the NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, CA, while attending UA.

In 1987, Mr. Elliott joined NASA full-time as a wind tunnel test engineer in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex, leading various tests in the 40-ft x 80-ft and 80-ft x 120-ft wind tunnels. In June 1991, Mr. Elliott joined the System Analysis and Integration Lab at the Marshall Spaceflight Center in Huntsville, AL where he provided systems engineering expertise for various launch vehicle and payload projects over a 7-year span. Mr. Elliott returned to his home state of Ohio and has been at the NASA GRC since 1998 where he has supported numerous spaceflight projects, including the upgrade of the test facilities at Plum Brook Station’s Space Power Facility which are currently supporting NASA’s Orion Program among other space vehicles.

Mr. Elliott is currently managing the Space Technology Mission Directorate Game Changing Development Program’s Extreme Environment Solar Power (EESP) Project and the Solar Arrays with Storage (SAWS) seedling study. The SAWS seedling study is a collaborative effort between GRC, Langley Research Center, Johnson Space Center, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory investigating the potential use of advanced photovoltaic and energy storage systems to provide surface power on Mars.

Fred Elliott
NASA Glenn Research Center

Lee Mason
Lee Mason
NASA Glenn Research Center


Lee Mason has been a power and propulsion technologist at NASA's Glenn Research Center for almost 30 years. During his career, he has helped to develop advanced radioisotope power systems for deep space science, compact fission reactors for surface power and nuclear electric propulsion, high temperature solar arrays for near-sun missions, solar dynamic power systems for the space station, and high power Hall-effect thrusters for earth orbiting satellites.

Prior to his new assignment as the Principal Technologist for Power and Energy Storage, Mr. Mason was Chief of the Thermal Energy Conversion Branch in the Glenn Power Division. His branch was instrumental in maturing the high efficiency Stirling power convertors and the alkali-metal heat pipes that could revolutionize future space nuclear power systems

He has written over 100 technical publications on space power and propulsion and generated several patent applications related to space nuclear power. Mr. Mason is the recipient of the NASA Exceptional Achievement Medal (2006), the Rotary National Stellar Award (2010), R&D100 Award (2013) and the NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal (2014). He holds a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Dayton and a M.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Cleveland State University.

Lee Mason
NASA Glenn Research Center

David McGowan
David McGowan
NASA Langley Research Center


David McGowan is currently the Chief Engineer for NASA Langley Research Center. As the center’s Chief Engineer, McGowan provides senior-level leadership for program and project engineering activities at the Center to insure the technical excellence required to meet the goals and objectives for all NASA Mission Directorates.

Prior to this role, McGowan served as the Space Technology Mission Directorate’s Principal Technologist for Lightweight Structures, Materials & Mechanical Systems. His term in this role was completed as a detail assignment from his position as the Deputy Director for Langley’s Space Technology and Exploration Directorate. McGowan has also completed a detail assignment to NASA Headquarters (HQ) as a Senior Technologist in the Office of the Chief Technologist and Space Technology Program (OCT/STP) Program Management & Integration Office. Prior to this assignment, he served as the Chief Engineer of the Orion Launch Abort System project where he was the technical lead for the LAS engineering team as they successfully completed the Pad Abort 1 flight test as well as the Preliminary Design Review for the production LAS design. Before joining the LAS project, McGowan held supervisory positions in the Engineering and Research Directorates at Langley Research Center. McGowan has received numerous awards, most notably the NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal and the Silver Snoopy Award for his work on the Launch Abort System.

McGowan began his career at LaRC as a co-operative education student in January 1986, and began full time as a research engineer in June 1989. During his tenure as a researcher, he contributed to aerospace systems development by conducting & leading research, technology, and development work as a technical team lead or co-lead on topic areas including structural concepts, damage tolerance, structural mechanics, active shape change, and inflatable rigidizable structures. He holds a Master’s Degree in Engineering Mechanics and a Bachelor’s Degree in Mechanical Engineering from Old Dominion University.

David McGowan
NASA Langley Research Center

Richard Pappa
Richard Pappa
NASA Langley Research Center


Richard Pappa has worked on aerospace structures at the NASA Langley Research Center since 1974 including 4 years initially with a local contractor, Wyle Labs. Over the years he has led teams for many challenging research and engineering projects primarily in the areas of structural dynamics, structural acoustics, large solar arrays and solar sails, and other lightweight deployable structures.

His first experience with large deployable solar arrays was with the Solar Array Flight Experiment in 1984 in which an ISS solar array prototype was successfully deployed and retracted in space from the Space Shuttle and its vibration properties were measured using photogrammetry. He presently serves as the Principal Investigator for solar arrays on a seedling study for the Solar Arrays with Storage (SAWS) project sponsored by NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate. He also manages the Deployable Structures SBIR subtopic for the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate.

Richard has two degrees in Mechanical Engineering from Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, a highly supportive wife, three grown children spread across the country, and two grandsons in Seattle.

Richard Pappa
NASA Langley Research Center

LaNetra Tate
Dr. LaNetra Tate
NASA Headquarters


Dr. LaNetra Tate joined NASA Kennedy Space Center in October of 2005. Dr. Tate currently works at NASA HQ within the Space Technology Mission Directorate as the Program Executive for the Game Changing Development Program. Prior to this role, Dr. Tate served as the STMD Advanced Manufacturing and Nanotechnology Principal Technologist. Prior to that position, she served as the Composites Lead in the Materials Science Division at Kennedy Space Center as well as the composite repair lead on the multi-center efforts, Composites for Exploration and Composite Cryotank projects. Dr. Tate completed a temporary assignment at Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL in support of the Advanced Composites Technologies project where she worked composite manufacturing and repair processes. Her areas of expertise include polymer matrix nanocomposites and composites, advanced manufacturing concepts and trends, and composite repair for aerospace systems.

Dr. Tate also served as the NASA STMD representative to the National Manufacturing Initiative in which she interacts with other government agencies, including Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) and National Economic Council (NEC).

Dr. Tate has received numerous awards, including the 2016 NASA Commercial Invention of the Year Award and the 2014 R&D 100 Award, both for work done at the Kennedy Space Center in the area of Color Changing Materials for Hydrogen Detection. Dr. Tate has also received the Exceptional Performance Award (2015, NASA HQ). Dr. Tate was profiled on the cover of USF Magazine (Nanotechnology: Take a Look at the Power of Small) for her work in carbon nanotube based composites. Dr. Tate holds 7 patents, 3 published patent applications, & 19 publications.

LaNetra Tate
NASA Headquarters

John Vickers
John Vickers
NASA Marshall Space Flight Center


John Vickers is currently the NASA principal technologist in the area of advanced manufacturing. He also serves as the Associate Director of the Materials and Processes Laboratory at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center and as the Manager of the NASA National Center for Advanced Manufacturing.

As principal technologist, he leads the nationwide NASA team to develop advanced manufacturing technology strategies to achieve the goals of NASA’s missions. In this role he represents the Agency supporting the President’s National Manufacturing Initiative and the Interagency Advanced Manufacturing National Program Office, which includes participation by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, NASA, the National Science Foundation, and other agencies. He also he leads the NASA Technology Roadmap effort for “Materials, Structures, Mechanisms and Manufacturing.”

John Vickers
NASA Marshall Space Flight Center